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Fruits of Apathy

Lucien Boutin is an illustrator, a cynic, and thinks he's funny.
Oct 17 '14
treebourbon:

quiyst:

mrzstargazzer:

jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.
Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.
Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.
"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.
But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.
The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.
Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.
"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.
Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.
“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.
Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.
http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:
An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

This is exactly why I stopped volunteering to help with lunch at my son’s school (a”catholic”school). They are ruthless. They literally snatch trays out of the kids hands. There were kindergarteners who would be moved to the “no lunch table” if the parents hadn’t paid for their lunches, but yet, they’d offer me, a volunteer, food for free.
One day I took a tray hoping I could divide the food among 3 kids who were denied food. You should’ve seen the uproar when I tried to offer the little ones at the no-lunch table the double helping of nuggets and tatortots given to me. I mean, I thought they were going to call the cops on me. I had to stop going because it was incredibly heartbreaking and rage-inducing to see kids go hungry while they handout extra lunches to the staff and throw the rest out.
I received no response from the archdiocese of NY when I wrote to them regarding this behavior. I mean, I could’ve sworn that all those “corporal works of mercy” they shove down your fucking throat (two of which happen to be feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty), actually meant that catholic schools should do just that with the children that attend their insanely expensive schools. But you know what the bible says- “it’s all about the bottom line kids”.

Our previous elementary school principal had worked out a deal with the PTO (PTA) wherein they had a fund that would cover the cost of the full lunch for kids who had depleted their accounts so that no kid had to get the cheese sandwich in the paper bag. The school board eventually chased this guy out because he exceeded state standards for student achievements and care.
When the new principal came in, he unilaterally scratched the program because “that’s just not how it should be done,” even though the PTO was more than happy to continue covering those kids’ meals. I fucking hated that guy.

Read this.

Back in 1996, when I was in sixth grade, I had a similarly outrageous experience. It was one of the many episodes of my school life that felt like the god damn Twilight Zone. I had a friend named Darryl. Darryl was, unfortunately, a poor kid. Skinny as a rail. Though he did bring his own lunches most of the time, they weren’t much. As is normal behavior in school cafeterias, we shared and traded food with him. There was never an issue there for the most part. Until one day.

Some kid in the cafeteria had an extra sandwich and asked the cafeteria monitor, Mr. Chartier, who also happened to be my teacher that year, if he would take the sandwich and find someone who wanted it. The offer was turned down by a couple tables before he offered it to our table. We all passed, and Mr. Chartier moved on to the next table. Darryl leaned over to me and told me that he wanted that sandwich. I asked him why he didn’t take the offer, and he told me he was too embarrassed to. So without hesitation, I called Mr. Chartier over and said that I’d like to take the sandwich. He handed it over to me, and I immediately handed it to Darryl. 

Now, any sane and rational human being would think that there’s no problem with this course of action. That there’s no lesson to be taught to anyone here. One kid spoke up for another, hungry kid, who was too embarrassed to speak up for himself. Seems like something an adult who teaches children for a living would find nice. Any sane and rational human being would think that.

Mr. Chartier, however, did not have anything close to a sane or rational reaction. He asked me why I gave Darryl the sandwich, when I was the one who asked for it. I told him why. He got angry and said that if Darryl wanted the sandwich so badly, then he should have spoke up for himself instead of getting me to do it for him. My brain was instantly flooded with confusion. He then demanded that Darryl give the sandwich back to me, and told me that I should eat it because I was the one who asked for it. I refused to eat it. I asked Mr. Chartier to just let Darryl have it. He kept demanding that I eat the sandwich, and I kept refusing.

Bent on teaching me some kind of lesson, Mr. Chartier forced me to carry the sandwich for the rest of the day, if I would not eat it. And so I, an extremely confused 11-year-old, carried the sandwich with me for the rest of the day. As if that was not enough, Mr. Chartier made snide remarks to me a few times during class like, “Getting hungry yet?”

The anger and confusion I felt was indescribable and is one of the many reasons why I am totally irreverent to authority. No justice was served by this bizarre punishment. One kid went hungry while another kid suffered embarrassment and taunts from not only his fellow students, but his own teacher as well. My mother was furious and complained to the principal, but nothing was done. They didn’t think it was a big deal.

I’m 29 now and a lot of what I learned in elementary and high school has faded away with time. The one lesson that was repeatedly ground into my head through all my years of schooling was that standing up for yourself or others is wrong. It’s one lesson I gladly ignore to this day.

treebourbon:

quiyst:

mrzstargazzer:

jepaithe:

transposedsouls:

boo-author:

bitterseafigtree:

thinksquad:

An eighth grade student from Weaverville Elementary School got a detention slip for sharing his school prepared lunch Tuesday.

Kyle Bradford, 13, shared his chicken burrito with a friend who didn’t like the cheese sandwich he was given by the cafeteria.

Bradford didn’t see any problem with sharing his food.

"It seemed like he couldn’t get a normal lunch so I just wanted to give mine to him because I wasn’t really that hungry and it was just going to go in the garbage if I didn’t eat it," said Bradford.

But the Trinity Alps Unified School District has regulations that prohibit students from sharing their meals.

The policies set by the district say that students can have allergies that another student may not be aware of.

Tom Barnett, the Superintendent of the Trinity Alps Unified School District says that hygiene issues also come into play when banning students from sharing meals.

"We have a policy that prohibits students from exchanging meals. Of course if students are concerned about other students not having enough to eat we would definitely want to consider that, but because of safety and liability we cannot allow students to actually exchange meals," said Barnett.

Bradford’s mother Sandy Bradford thinks that her son did the right thing by sharing his lunch. She also believes that it isn’t up to the school to discipline her son for good manners.

“By all means the school can teach them math and the arithmetic and physical education, but when it comes to morals and manners and compassion, I believe it needs to start at home with the parent,” Sandy said.

Bradford says that he would definitely share his lunch again if a friend wanted a portion of his meal.

http://www.krcrtv.com/news/local/student-put-in-detention-for-sharing-school-lunch/28115110

Kids can’t share now? Or trade lunches? What the actual fuck is happening?

I think this article is talking around what the actual issue is.

The student who was “given a cheese sandwich” and “couldn’t get a normal lunch?”

That’s how schools handle students whose families can’t pay their lunch bills. They’re required to give the kid something, so they get a slice of processed cheese between two pieces of white bread. Cheese sandwich.

All those stories about the kids who went through the lines and then had their trays taken away and dumped in the trash in front of them because their account was $5 in the red when they got to the end of the line?

Those kids were given cheese sandwiches.

This isn’t about allergies. I guarantee you that kids at those tables are swapping food all the time. It’s part of the school cafeteria experience.

If the second kid was allergic to the burrito, we’d be reading a different story.

It’s because this kid undermined the system that is supposed to punish students for their parents’ “negligence” (poverty).

^ this

Taken from this article:

These aren’t isolated cases, either. Here’s a recap of the most recent honor roll of American public school cafeteria douchebaggery:

  • An elementary school in Salt Lake City, Utah reportedly seized between 40 and 50 students’ lunches on pizza day and threw them all in the garbage when the kids got up to the register and couldn’t pay because their account balances were either low or empty. Students all over the cafeteria were broken down in tears. I’m sure that made for a great learning environment.
  • Remember the most important meal of the day? A 12-year-old Dickinson, Texas boy’s breakfast was thrown in the trash right in front of him at his middle school because his account was short a whopping .30 cents. The breakfast itself cost $1.25.
  • Around 25 students at a Massachusetts middle school were forced to throw out their lunches or refused lunch entirely because their accounts were empty or they could not afford to pay. An employee from the school’s on-site lunch provider reportedly gave an order not to provide lunch to students with overextended credit or empty accounts. At least that employee was later put on leave. “I’m pissed that when there are people in prison who are getting meals, my daughter, an honor student, is going hungry,” one father remarked.
  • A New Jersey elementary school threw a 10-year-old autistic boy’s lunch in the trash because of an unpaid account…despite having already done so before. “It’s between the parents and the cafeteria. It’s not between the child and the lunch lady. Let the kids eat their lunch,” the boy’s mother told a local news station.
  • The middle and high schools in Old Town, Maine have a “no pay, no food policy” that Superintendent David Walker says students, like the 11-year-old denied food because his mom hadn’t paid his account, should be able to understand. “Students are old enough to take responsibility for their lunches” by middle school age, said Walker. You know, because apparently 11-year-olds can suddenly get jobs in this country to afford their lunch at school.
  • Over 40 elementary school students in Kentucky were denied a full lunch during state testing week. One student’s account was short $1.15, which the mother told a news station she paid online as many schools require the night before, but the funds hadn’t been processed by lunch time the next day, so her fourth grader spent all day upset and left school crying at the end of the day. Luckily a good samaritan showed up to that school and donated $56 to pay up all student lunch accounts so no more kids would have to go without a full lunch (which isn’t even that large to begin with in this country) during state tests.
  • Worse, apparently students at some schools across the state of Minnesota are actually branded with “Money” or “Lunch” stamps across their hands when they are late on accounts as a message to parents to pay up. Yep, they are actually branding children with the scarlet letter of poverty if they cannot afford their lunch, so the child will have to walk around school for the whole entire rest of their day branded and a walking target for ridicule by other children because they are poor or the parents forgot to put money in their children’s accounts.

I’ve personally had the same type of situation happened to me before in which lunch has been thrown right in the trash in front of me when I didn’t have enough money for lunch, and was given an alternate meal of lesser quality. I hadn’t even realized how disgustingly perverse that was at the time because of how it was normalized. Shaming the poor, and even depriving children of food has become normalized. This is especially a problem in conservative states where funding for education is low and funding for things like football stadiums and other less important things is high. Public schools need to be providing students with free meals, which can’t be done without the proper funding as well as the proper allocation of funds on the part of schools and school districts. 

This is exactly why I stopped volunteering to help with lunch at my son’s school (a”catholic”school).
They are ruthless. They literally snatch trays out of the kids hands. There were kindergarteners who would be moved to the “no lunch table” if the parents hadn’t paid for their lunches, but yet, they’d offer me, a volunteer, food for free.

One day I took a tray hoping I could divide the food among 3 kids who were denied food. You should’ve seen the uproar when I tried to offer the little ones at the no-lunch table the double helping of nuggets and tatortots given to me. I mean, I thought they were going to call the cops on me. I had to stop going because it was incredibly heartbreaking and rage-inducing to see kids go hungry while they handout extra lunches to the staff and throw the rest out.

I received no response from the archdiocese of NY when I wrote to them regarding this behavior. I mean, I could’ve sworn that all those “corporal works of mercy” they shove down your fucking throat (two of which happen to be feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty), actually meant that catholic schools should do just that with the children that attend their insanely expensive schools. But you know what the bible says- “it’s all about the bottom line kids”.

Our previous elementary school principal had worked out a deal with the PTO (PTA) wherein they had a fund that would cover the cost of the full lunch for kids who had depleted their accounts so that no kid had to get the cheese sandwich in the paper bag. The school board eventually chased this guy out because he exceeded state standards for student achievements and care.

When the new principal came in, he unilaterally scratched the program because “that’s just not how it should be done,” even though the PTO was more than happy to continue covering those kids’ meals. I fucking hated that guy.

Read this.

Back in 1996, when I was in sixth grade, I had a similarly outrageous experience. It was one of the many episodes of my school life that felt like the god damn Twilight Zone. I had a friend named Darryl. Darryl was, unfortunately, a poor kid. Skinny as a rail. Though he did bring his own lunches most of the time, they weren’t much. As is normal behavior in school cafeterias, we shared and traded food with him. There was never an issue there for the most part. Until one day.

Some kid in the cafeteria had an extra sandwich and asked the cafeteria monitor, Mr. Chartier, who also happened to be my teacher that year, if he would take the sandwich and find someone who wanted it. The offer was turned down by a couple tables before he offered it to our table. We all passed, and Mr. Chartier moved on to the next table. Darryl leaned over to me and told me that he wanted that sandwich. I asked him why he didn’t take the offer, and he told me he was too embarrassed to. So without hesitation, I called Mr. Chartier over and said that I’d like to take the sandwich. He handed it over to me, and I immediately handed it to Darryl. 

Now, any sane and rational human being would think that there’s no problem with this course of action. That there’s no lesson to be taught to anyone here. One kid spoke up for another, hungry kid, who was too embarrassed to speak up for himself. Seems like something an adult who teaches children for a living would find nice. Any sane and rational human being would think that.

Mr. Chartier, however, did not have anything close to a sane or rational reaction. He asked me why I gave Darryl the sandwich, when I was the one who asked for it. I told him why. He got angry and said that if Darryl wanted the sandwich so badly, then he should have spoke up for himself instead of getting me to do it for him. My brain was instantly flooded with confusion. He then demanded that Darryl give the sandwich back to me, and told me that I should eat it because I was the one who asked for it. I refused to eat it. I asked Mr. Chartier to just let Darryl have it. He kept demanding that I eat the sandwich, and I kept refusing.

Bent on teaching me some kind of lesson, Mr. Chartier forced me to carry the sandwich for the rest of the day, if I would not eat it. And so I, an extremely confused 11-year-old, carried the sandwich with me for the rest of the day. As if that was not enough, Mr. Chartier made snide remarks to me a few times during class like, “Getting hungry yet?”

The anger and confusion I felt was indescribable and is one of the many reasons why I am totally irreverent to authority. No justice was served by this bizarre punishment. One kid went hungry while another kid suffered embarrassment and taunts from not only his fellow students, but his own teacher as well. My mother was furious and complained to the principal, but nothing was done. They didn’t think it was a big deal.

I’m 29 now and a lot of what I learned in elementary and high school has faded away with time. The one lesson that was repeatedly ground into my head through all my years of schooling was that standing up for yourself or others is wrong. It’s one lesson I gladly ignore to this day.

(Source: thinksquad)

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I LIVE!
Welcome to all of my new followers! I love you.
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Welcome to all of my new followers! I love you.

More arts will come soon, but for now, I have made a new Twitter header! Here’s a cropped version.

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